Special Handling

Shipping Seafood

Our seafood experience spans over eight decades, particularly serving the seafood capital of North America - the state of Alaska. We ship millions of pounds of seafood not only from Alaska, but between the coasts and from Hawai'i and are unrelentingly committed to delivering fresh seafood products for our customers.

Our familiarity with commercial fishing and small producers provides us the knowledge to treat your seafood with the utmost care from the water to the plate, where it ultimately is headed.


Packaging
To maximize freshness and quality, products must be able to withstand a minimum of 48 hours without refrigeration. To achieve the best destination temperature, we advise freezing or chilling seafood thoroughly before packaging.
 
  • Leakage must be prevented at all times.
  • Packages must be sealed or secured and should be marked with indelible inks and waterproof labels.
  • Select durable, watertight packaging, preferably with insulation. Sturdy metal or hard plastic camping coolers, or commercially manufactured seafood shipping boxes, are preferred.
  • For live shellfish such as crab, shipments must be packed carefully in approved containers, such as insulated totes or wetlock cartons, and clearly marked with “This Side Up” labels.
  • If multi-walled, fully waxed corrugated (e.g., wet-lock) boxes are used, the contents must be sealed in a 4-mil polyethylene liner (or two 2-mil liners) to prevent leakage.
  • Previously used containers are not acceptable.
  • Containers must be sealed or secured with strapping tape, or a similar material.
  • Styrofoam containers made for shipping may be accepted from commercial shippers only.
  • Air freight containers (EO, EH or E) are not accepted for shipping seafood.
  • Gel ice packs are recommended to hold perishables at proper temperatures.
  • Wet ice is not allowed.
  • Dry ice is excellent for freezing perishables. Each container must be clearly marked with the words “DRY ICE” and the quantity of dry ice. More than 5.5 pounds requires Dangerous Goods documentation.

Labeling and Marking
All containers of seafood and wildlife (including shellfish) being shipped interstate must be marked according to the 1988 Lacey Act. A Fish/Wildlife sticker may be used by the shipper to provide required information. The following six items are to be prominently displayed on each shipment:
 
  • Name and address of shipper and consignee
  • 24-hour phone number of the consignee
  • Commodity noted as Fish or Wildlife
  • Specifies species name: such as king salmon or halibut
  • Number of each species or the weight of each type species
  • Each container must be marked Live, Fresh or Frozen

Weight Limitations
Generally, seafood shipments are limited to a maximum of 100 lbs. per piece.

Exceptions:
  • Honolulu, Los Angeles, San Diego, Maui and San Francisco may accept fish boxes up to 150 lbs.
  • On Freighter aircraft seafood is allowed in boxes up to 150 lbs.

Facility Information

With seafood and shellfish, maintaining quality and freshness is critical. We have coolers and freezers at most of our facilities. We’ll make every effort to store perishable shipments in coolers or freezers while awaiting recovery, but please remember to package products to withstand 48 hours without refrigeration as space can be limited.

Book your shipment in advance online
or 
by calling us at:
1-800-225-2752

You must be a Known Shipper to ship seafood.  

We do not assume financial liability for spoilage, thawing or freezing due to delays in transit, unless there is clear evidence of mishandling or negligence. 

Shipping Perishables

 

We're committed to delivering perishables in pristine condition to over 100 destinations. Our customer service and knowledge of pershable shipping is something we take seriously. From temperature-controlled cool and cold chain capabilities, to dedicated training for all agents, we treat your products with the utmost care. We accept perishable goods that include fresh herbs, fresh fruit, vegetables and other foodstuffs, hatching eggs, plants and cut flowers.


Packaging

It is the shipper's responsibility to package all perishable shipments. Perishable items must be packaged to withstand 48 hours in transit without refrigeration.
  • Gel ice packs are recommended, as wet ice is prohibited.
  • Styrofoam containers designed for shipping may be accepted from commercial shippers only. 
  • Leakage must be prevented at all times.
  • Open top cardboard boxes, particularly for berry flats should be topped.

How to Ship Seafood

Looking for information on seafood shipping? We're experts in that too.


Book your shipment in advance online
or 
by calling us at:
1-800-225-2752

We do not assume financial liability for spoilage, thawing or freezing due to delays in transit, unless there is clear evidence of mishandling or negligence. 
 

Shipping Dangerous Goods or Hazardous Materials

Common Goods and Materials

To avoid hassles or potential fines, we want to help you from getting caught off guard when shipping dangerous goods. The information below will help ensure your shipments are properly declared and packaged. Many commonly shipped products are designated as dangerous or hazardous when shipped as cargo. 

Dry Ice

Alaska Air Cargo does accept carbon dioxide solid (commonly known as dry ice) for shipping but it must be packaged and labeled properly.
 
Packaging
Shipments must be tendered in packaging constructed to permit the release of carbon dioxide gas. This is to prevent a buildup of pressure that can rupture packaging. Sturdy outer packaging is required. Styrofoam coolers are not allowed.
Labeling and Marking
Packages that contain 5.5 lbs. or less of dry ice must be marked “Dry Ice” or “Carbon Dioxide, Solid,” followed by the net weight of the dry ice and the identification of the contents being cooled or frozen.   

Packages that contain more than 5.5 lbs. of dry ice must be marked with the net quantity of dry ice, the shipper and consignee’s names and addresses, and a Class 9 Miscellaneous hazard label. If an air waybill is used, the Nature and Quantity of Goods field must contain the Proper Shipping Name (“Dry Ice” or “Carbon dioxide, solid”), Class 9, UN1845, the number of packages and the net weight of dry ice in each package.
Read More

Lithium Batteries

Alaska Air Cargo ships lithium cells or batteries provided they are in good condition. Defective or damaged lithium batteries or those intended for waste disposal or recycling can't be shipped. Shipments of UN 3481 and UN 3091 lithium batteries packed with or contained in equipment are acecpted. UN 3480 and UN 3090 lithium batteries in a package without equipment (including portable rechargers) are only accepted for transport on freighter aircraft. 
Technical Specifications
You may need to ask your battery manufacturer for technical data before tendering battery shipments as cargo. For more specific requirements for shipping lithium batteries, please refer to the following the FAA SafeCargo website.
Read More

Household Goods

Many common household products contain or are designated as dangerous goods; hairspray, cooking spray, nail polish and ammunition, to name a few. What is allowed to pack in baggage when flying may not be allowed to ship in cargo. If you're unsure if your items are cleared to fly, please read the information available on this page to familiarize yourself with the ins and outs of shipping dangerous goods. 
 
Examples of commonly shipped dangerous goods:
Aerosols: such as spray paint, cooking spray, shaving cream, compressed air dusters, whipped cream, bug spray, hairspray

Flammable liquids: such as nail polish, hand sanitizer, vanilla extract lighter fluid

Corrosives: such as liquid drain cleaner or bleach

Flammable or compressed gas: such as a lighter or life preserver

Explosives: such as ammunition or fireworks

Oxidizers: such as hydrogen peroxide

Flammable solids: such as matches

Read More

Common Goods and Materials

To avoid hassles or potential fines, we want to help you from getting caught off guard when shipping dangerous goods. The information below will help ensure your shipments are properly declared and packaged. Many commonly shipped products are designated as dangerous or hazardous when shipped as cargo. 

Dry Ice

Alaska Air Cargo does accept carbon dioxide solid (commonly known as dry ice) for shipping but it must be packaged and labeled properly.
 
Packaging
Shipments must be tendered in packaging constructed to permit the release of carbon dioxide gas. This is to prevent a buildup of pressure that can rupture packaging. Sturdy outer packaging is required. Styrofoam coolers are not allowed.
Labeling and Marking
Packages that contain 5.5 lbs. or less of dry ice must be marked “Dry Ice” or “Carbon Dioxide, Solid,” followed by the net weight of the dry ice and the identification of the contents being cooled or frozen.   

Packages that contain more than 5.5 lbs. of dry ice must be marked with the net quantity of dry ice, the shipper and consignee’s names and addresses, and a Class 9 Miscellaneous hazard label. If an air waybill is used, the Nature and Quantity of Goods field must contain the Proper Shipping Name (“Dry Ice” or “Carbon dioxide, solid”), Class 9, UN1845, the number of packages and the net weight of dry ice in each package.
Read More

Lithium Batteries

Alaska Air Cargo ships lithium cells or batteries provided they are in good condition. Defective or damaged lithium batteries or those intended for waste disposal or recycling can't be shipped. Shipments of UN 3481 and UN 3091 lithium batteries packed with or contained in equipment are acecpted. UN 3480 and UN 3090 lithium batteries in a package without equipment (including portable rechargers) are only accepted for transport on freighter aircraft. 
Technical Specifications
You may need to ask your battery manufacturer for technical data before tendering battery shipments as cargo. For more specific requirements for shipping lithium batteries, please refer to the following the FAA SafeCargo website.
Read More

Household Goods

Many common household products contain or are designated as dangerous goods; hairspray, cooking spray, nail polish and ammunition, to name a few. What is allowed to pack in baggage when flying may not be allowed to ship in cargo. If you're unsure if your items are cleared to fly, please read the information available on this page to familiarize yourself with the ins and outs of shipping dangerous goods. 
 
Examples of commonly shipped dangerous goods:
Aerosols: such as spray paint, cooking spray, shaving cream, compressed air dusters, whipped cream, bug spray, hairspray

Flammable liquids: such as nail polish, hand sanitizer, vanilla extract lighter fluid

Corrosives: such as liquid drain cleaner or bleach

Flammable or compressed gas: such as a lighter or life preserver

Explosives: such as ammunition or fireworks

Oxidizers: such as hydrogen peroxide

Flammable solids: such as matches

Read More

What to Know Before You Ship  

General Information 
Alaska Air Cargo transports hazardous materials, also known as hazmat or dangerous goods, in accordance with Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations (49 CFR) and the International Air Transport Association (IATA) Dangerous Goods Regulations.

Preparations for Shipping  
Shippers are often unaware or misunderstand the requirements for properly declaring and transporting dangerous goods or the risks associated with their shipment. Correct declaration, classification, packaging, marking and labeling are the responsibility of the shipper. Dangerous goods must always be fully declared and must be prepared prior to shipping. Violations may result in civil or criminal penalties up to $250,000 and/or five years in prison.

How to Identify Dangerous Goods

Two helpful online resources are:

FAA SafeCargo website

DOT Check The Box website
Always Check with Your Local Station 
Not all Alaska Air Cargo locations accept dangerous goods and our handling ability varies by aircraft type/operating carrier. Before booking, refer to our city pages to ensure the origin station can accept your shipment.

Dangerous Goods Sometimes Require Extra Fees
In addition to transportation charges, shipments of Dangerous Goods have a surcharge.

Dangerous Goods fees do not apply to:
  • Diagnostic specimens
  • UN3373 Biological substance, Category B 
  • Biohazards 
  • Dangerous goods in excepted quantities
  • Excepted packages of radioactive material
  • Non-dangerous goods packed in dry shipper (Special Provision A152)
  • Dry ice (carbon dioxide, solid)



Book your shipment in advance online
or 
by calling us at:
1-800-225-2752  

Transporting Human Remains

We understand that dealing with loss can be overwhelming. Our priority is to make the shipping process as seamless and supportive as possible, and to bring your loved one home respectfully, safely and quickly.

We offer:

  • Highest priority booking and special handling

  • Airport-to-airport service

  • Streamlined tracking and notifcations

  • A special Fallen Soldier program 


Starting the Process
Transporting human remains has complex rules and requires detailed planning.  For this reason, customers must work with their preferred funeral home or medical institution (such as a hospital or nursing home) who is authorized to ship human remains and is familiar with all the associated intricacies of the process. 

Requirements for Transporting Human Remains 
  • Human remains must be accompanied by a death certificate signed by a physician or health care officer, or a burial removal permit and/or transit permit, as required by law. Please contact the state officials at your origin and destination for full details on all regulations and document requirements. Your funeral director will ensure you have the necessary paperwork. 
  • Human remains must be adequately secured in a tightly closed, leak proof container. 
  • The container must be enclosed in an outside shipping container of wood, metal, canvas, plastic or paperboard construction, with enough strength and padding to protect the container from damage. 
  • If the container weighs more than 400 pounds, it must have at least six handles. 
  • The container must not exceed the cargo size limits of the aircraft being used for shipment. 

Transportation Rates

 

Please contact us at 1-800-225-2752 with any questions you may have. We’re here to help.

Qualified funeral directors are familiar with all the regulations on this page and will work with us to ensure compliance.


Transporting Cremated Remains  
Cremated remains traveling as cargo are subject to the same minimum requirements listed above. Optionally, customers on Alaska Airlines passenger flights may bring cremated human remains on board as carry-on or checked baggage. Please visit the TSA website to learn about its security screening requirements. 

Fallen Soldier Program

When we have the honor of transporting a service member who has made the ultimate sacrifice, Alaska Air Cargo's Fallen Soldier program ensures that proper protocols are followed, including special arrangements for military escorts. Alaska Airlines has special carts at our flight locations. With blue paint, red carpet and a retractable American flag curtain, these special carts include plaques representing the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines and Coast Guard. We make them available for any airline to use when transporting soldiers’ remains. 

More info on our Fallen Soldier Program can be found here

We cannot accept shipments of human remains outside of the United States.  

Shipping Wild Game

We accept shipments of finished products processed by a butcher, meat processor or taxidermist. We also accept shipments of antlers. Shipments must follow general shipping guidelines and be packaged to prevent leaks and noticeable odors.


Regulatory Compliance  
Customers are responsible for complying with fish and wildlife regulatory requirements and should contact the appropriate state and federal government agencies for details and applicable permits, forms, labels or tags. 

In addition to the general requirements above, there are many specific regulations to consider when shipping goods of this nature, a few of which are highlighted below.
Lacey Act
A conservation law in the United States that prohibits trade in wildlife, fish and plants that have been illegally taken, possessed, transported or sold.
Labeling and Marking  
All containers of seafood and wildlife (including shellfish) being shipped interstate must be marked according to the 1988 Lacey Act. A Fish/Wildlife sticker may be used by the shipper to provide required information. The following six items are to be prominently displayed on each shipment:
  • Name and address of shipper and consignee, or passenger. 
  • 24-hour phone number of the consignee or passenger. 
  • Commodity noted as Fish or Wildlife.
  • Specifies species name, such as: king salmon, moose, caribou, silver salmon. 
  • Number of each species or the weight of each typeof species. 
  • Each container must be marked Live, Fresh or Frozen.

Book your shipment in advance online  
or 
by calling us at:
1-800-225-2752